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Posts Tagged ‘Dawna Markova’

“I stumble forward in a dim light, finding my way to the vitality that is passion one step at a time,” Dawna Markova.

What passions are you afraid to try because they might sound silly, too hard, or too frightening to entertain? I want you to consider a BIG one that is really scary and juicy at the same time. I have a passion for writing a book or two. For a while, I thought that this sounded like a frivolous way to spend time. Wow!! Did I let my inner saboteur get a hold of me or what?

My next reaction was to turn this idea around. I explored in my journal writing my need for approval from those individuals who thought that the chances of ever publishing a book was nearly zero. For now, they just weren’t in the mode to understand taking this risk. No problem, I wouldn’t go bungee jumping if asked.  But writing about something that inspired ME seemed to make more and more sense.  And seeking approval made less and less.

I wrote about moving past my conundrum and enumerated the steps to move forward in a straighter line. I’ve been writing  my book for a few months and making some progress page by page. And this effort has bolstered my courage in myself and my passions.

So let go of your inhibitions today! Write about what makes you get up and go in life. No one will grade the paper. You have full permission to go all out on your nuggets of gold and take a step into this passionate nature of yours!

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Dear readers and prospective journalers,

All you need to start journaling is a pencil and paper. The dollar outlay is minimal but the reward is priceless!

Journaling has become more popular in the recent past because many people have found it helpful. In a snap we can find a safe spot to be honest and tell own stories. Over the last few decades journal mentors like Kathleen Adams and Susan Borkin have come up with wonderful methods to help. Their thoughtful prompts have assisted scores of us to move through our muddled minds and find a greater sense of self.  On this journey of self-discovery, our journals became our friends and companions.

So let’s get started. Take a leap into uncharted territory and gain insights into how you work and why. Let’s go on this journey: writing  by heart.

Here’s my guidebook–NOT a rule book–on journaling!

1. Find a safe space for you and your journal.

2. Use whatever you want for this writing experience; pens, pencils, colored markers and the like, and choose a journal that reflects your style whether plain, fancy, or in between.

3. Remove the censor inside you that says, “don’t do this.”

4. Write rapidly and don’t stop to correct yourself. This is about process, not product!

5. Center before you write. At least take a few breaths and relax your body from head to toe.

6. Be truthful with yourself as this will aid your process of self-discovery.

7. Write for a few minutes, sometimes five is enough, or perhaps forty-five if the juices are flowing. Keeping yourself within a timed boundary can center you.

8. If you have time, reread and give yourself some feedback about the experience. Did you learn something about yourself? Were you surprised? Perhaps you have spurred on other prompts to write about later.

9. Give yourself a pat on the back because you took this time for yourself. Any time we spend in quality communion with our own souls is valuable time.

Those are the guidelines, but what about the work?

My first journal prompt for the week is derived from a famous line of a poem by Dawna Markova, “I will not die an unlived life.” So what, dear reader, is the part of you that wants to live more out in the open, to do something new, to share of yourself more fully in this lifetime?

Breathe, release your tension, and take some gentle steps to begin. Envision yourself in a room with lots of possibilites. Review your unique gifts. Take time to become more in tune with them. Detail each one of these qualities in your journal, or draw, or collage them if you feel comfortable using these mediums.  Using stick figures or pictures from old magazines works!

You might go through an old album this week to look at photos of yourself enjoying something at an early age. See if that speaks to you now. What is the important part that has gone dormant. Write about how it makes you feel and how you’d like to capture that part of yourself again.

If you have trouble visualizing this, you might simply make time to look at a sunrise or sunset. Take in the fullness of nature. See if this helps you open up to your higher self.

Do any or all of this and see how the sparks fly.

I extend good wishes for fruitful writing.

I want to add a cautionary note. Whatever we share here is in a safe space. It is important as compassionate listeners that we reside here only to support each other. We limit our comments to highlighting those words that personally resonate for us. Alternatively, we can just listen. These responses are spare and powerful.

Best wishes for writing from the heart this week and see you later!

Karen

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